Nursing Care of Older People with Diabetes

 Nursing  Comments Off on Nursing Care of Older People with Diabetes
Feb 032019
 

Diabetes presents differently in older people and normal ageing processes, predisposition to specific complications, and other co-morbid conditions complicate its management. The underlying philosophy of this book is that there are opportunities for prevention, health maintenance and rehabilitation for older people with diabetes, which can realistically improve their quality of life. This book is an easy to follow essential guide to providing skilled and effective care for older people with diabetes in community, acute and residential care settings. It aims to provide nurses and other health professionals with the knowledge needed to accurately diagnose, treat and care for older people with diabetes. It draws upon guidance from the National Service Frameworks for Diabetes and Care of Older People (UK) and the Department of Human Service Standards (Australia) and provides an ideal companion to Care of People with Diabetes.Content: Chapter 1 Introduction to Diabetes in Older People (pages 1–21): Trisha DunningChapter 2 Managing Diabetes in Older People (pages 22–90): Trisha DunningChapter 3 Developing Care Systems for Older People (pages 93–112): Angus ForbesChapter 4 Short?Term Complications of Diabetes (pages 113–134): Michelle RobinsChapter 5 Long?Term Complications of Diabetes (pages 135–188): Trisha DunningChapter 6 Educating and Communicating with Older People (pages 189–198): Trisha DunningChapter 7 Rehabilitation, Respite and Palliative Care (pages 199–210): Trisha DunningChapter 8 Mental Health, Depression, Dementia and Diabetes (pages 211–229): Trisha Dunning and Michelle RobinsChapter 9 Effective Medication Management in Older People (pages 230–249): Susan HuntChapter 10 Sexuality and Older People with Diabetes (pages 250–263): Trisha DunningChapter 11 Using Complementary Therapies Wisely in Older People (pages 264–282): Trisha DunningChapter 12 Resources (pages 283–286): Trisha Dunning and Michelle Robins

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Variant Haemoglobins: A Guide to Identification

 Miscellaneous  Comments Off on Variant Haemoglobins: A Guide to Identification
Feb 032019
 

Variant Haemoglobins – A Guide to Identification is based on the premise that any single diagnostic technique offers only a very provisional identification of a variant haemoglobin. In routine diagnostic practice two techniques are needed as a minimum, with the results being interpreted in the light of the clinical details, blood count, blood film and ethnic origin. This book covers 150 normal and variant haemoglobins that have been studied and carefully documented. Variant Haemoglobins has four introductory chapters followed by an invaluable atlas. The introductory chapters cover the genetics of haemoglobin synthesis the principles of tests employed for identification common haemoglobins of major clinical or diagnostic importance thalassaemias and related conditions The atlas section comprises 170 full colour pages in which each variant haemoglobin or combination of haemoglobins is illustrated by cellulose acetate electrophoresis at alkaline pH, agarose gel electrophoresis at acid pH, isoelectric focusing and one or more HPLC traces. For ease of reference, the atlas pages are arranged according to the retention time of each haemoglobin on HPLC, this becoming increasingly the primary technique employed in haemoglobin identification. Bringing a mix of necessary scientific expertise and clinical knowledge, each author has more than 30 years experience in the diagnosis of variant haemoglobins. Providing otherwise unavailable information, this unique and practical guide is illustrated with over 700 high quality colour digital images plus flow charts and line diagrams covers common and important haemoglobin variants, in addition to many rarer ones is an essential reference source for diagnosis in the haematology laboratory A remarkably useful book, Variant Haemoglobins will be valuable for haematopathologists, clinical and laboratory haematologists in practice and in training and all laboratory staff involved in haemoglobinopathy diagnosis.Content: Chapter 1 Globin Genes and Haemoglobin (pages 1–8): Chapter Two Diagnostic Procedures and Principles of Commonly Used Tests (pages 9–26): Chapter Three Common Haemoglobins of Major Clinical or Diagnostic Importance (pages 27–56): Chapter Four The Thalassaemias and Related Conditions (pages 57–71):
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Thomas’ Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, Third Edition

 Hematology  Comments Off on Thomas’ Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, Third Edition
Feb 032019
 

NEW – the leading book in its field now fully updated and revised!Click here to access two FREE sample chapters!An Essential resource for all hematologists, oncologists, pathologists, pediatricians, immunologists and all others interested in this dynamic area of medicine!Why you should buy this book….Extensive coverage of subject area – from the scientific basis to the view of the futureIncludes all experimental research and clinical applicationCombined the knowledge and expertise of over 170 international specialistsClear structure and layoutOver 500 illustrations, including a colour plate section Why buy the NEW edition……New and fully revised to reflect the latest developments in this fast moving field10 new chapters, covering some of the latest developments – see below for the complete tables of content Content: Chapter 1 A History of Bone Marrow Transplantation (pages 1–8): E. Donnall ThomasChapter 2 Uses and Growth of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 9–15): Mary M. HorowitzChapter 3 Overview of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Immunology (pages 16–30): Paul J. MartinChapter 4 Histocompatibility (pages 31–42): Eric Mickelson and Effie W. PetersdorfChapter 5 Functional Evolution of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (pages 43–52): Lakshmi K. GaurChapter 6 The Hematopoietic Microenvironment (pages 53–61): Claudio Brunstein and Catherine M. VerfaillieChapter 7 Molecular Aspects of Stem Cell Renewal (pages 62–68): Peter M. LansdorpChapter 8 Biology of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells (pages 69–95): Markus G. Manz, Koichi Akashi and Irving L. WeissmanChapter 9 Expansion of Hematopoietic Stem Cells (pages 96–106): Colleen Delaney, Robert Andrews and Irwin BernsteinChapter 10 Methods for Gene Transfer: Genetic Manipulation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells (pages 107–117): Thomas Moritz and David A. WilliamsChapter 11 Clinical Trials of Gene Marking and Gene Therapy Using Hematopoietic Stem Cells (pages 118–129): Donald B. Kohn and Gay M. CrooksChapter 12 Pharmacologic Basis for High?Dose Chemotherapy (pages 130–157): James H. Doroshow and Timothy SynoldChapter 13 Preparative Regimens and Modification of Regimen?Related Toxicities (pages 158–177): William I. Bensinger and Ricardo SpielbergerChapter 14 Radiotherapeutic Principles of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 178–197): Brenda Shank and Richard T. HoppeChapter 15 Radioimmunotherapy and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 198–208): Dana C. Matthews and Frederick R. AppelbaumChapter 16 Pharmacology and the Use of Immunosuppressive Agents After Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 209–220): Nelson J. ChaoChapter 17 T?Cell Depletion to Prevent Graft?vs.?Host Disease (pages 221–233): Robert J. SoifferChapter 18 Documentation of Engraftment and Characterization of Chimerism Following Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 234–243): Eileen Bryant and Paul J. MartinChapter 19 Antibody Mediated Purging (pages 244–253): John G. GribbenChapter 20 Pharmacologic Purging of Bone Marrow (pages 254–257): O. Michael ColvinChapter 21 Molecular Inhibition of Gene Expression in Hematopoietic Cells (pages 258–271): Joanna B. Opalinska and Alan M. GewirtzChapter 22 The Detection and Significance of Minimal Residual Disease (pages 272–285): Jerald P. Radich and Marilyn L. SlovakChapter 23 Pathology of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 286–299): George E. Sale, Howard M. Shulman and Robert C. HackmanChapter 24 Mechanisms of Tolerance (pages 300–323): Megan SykesChapter 25 The Experimental Basis for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Autoimmune Diseases (pages 324–343): Judith A. ShizuruChapter 26 Murine Models for Graft?Vs.?Host Disease (pages 344–352): Robert Korngold and Thea M. FriedmanChapter 27 The Pathophysiology of Graft?Vs.?Host Disease (pages 353–368): James L. M. Ferrara and Joseph AntinChapter 28 Graft?Vs.?Tumor Responses (pages 369–379): Alexander FeferChapter 29 Adoptive Immunotherapy With Antigen?Specific T Cells (pages 380–404): Stanley R. Riddell and Philip D. GreenbergChapter 30 Autologous Graft?vs.?Host Disease (pages 405–413): Allan D. Hess and Richard J. JonesChapter 31 Biostatistical Methods in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 414–433): Joyce C. NilandChapter 32 Outcomes Research in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 434–446): Stephanie J. LeeChapter 33 The Evaluation and Counseling of Candidates for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 447–462): Karl G. Blume and Michael D. AmylonChapter 34 Clinical and Administrative Support for Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Programs (pages 463–468): Laura L. Adams and Angela A. JohnsChapter 35 Nursing Issues in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 469–482): Rosemary C. Ford, Judy Campbell and Juanita MadisonChapter 36 The Patient’s Perspective (pages 483–487): Susan K. StewartChapter 37 Ethical Issues in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 488–496): David S. SnyderChapter 38 Psychosocial Issues in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 497–506): Michael A. Andrykowski and Richard P. McquellonChapter 39 Assessment of Quality of Life in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipients (pages 507–518): Karen SyrjalaChapter 40 Sexuality After Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 519–528): D. Kathryn TierneyChapter 41 Hematopoietic Cell Procurement, Processing and Transplantation: Regulation and Accreditation (pages 529–537): Phyllis I. Warkentin, Lewis Nick and Elizabeth J. ShpallChapter 42 Hematopoietic Cell Donors (pages 538–549): Dennis L. ConferChapter 43 Cord Blood Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 550–564): Hal E. Broxmeyer and Franklin O. SmithChapter 44 In Utero Transplantation (pages 565–575): Alan W. Flake and Esmail D. ZanjaniChapter 45 Mobilization of Autologous Peripheral Blood Hematopoietic Cells for Support of High?Dose Cancer Therapy (pages 576–587): Judith Ng?Cashin and Thomas SheaChapter 46 Peripheral Blood Hematopoietic Cells for Allogeneic Transplantation (pages 588–598): Norbert SchmitzChapter 47 Cryopreservation of Hematopoietic Cells (pages 599–612): Scott D. RowleyChapter 48 Recombinant Growth Factors After Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 613–623): JuRgen Finke and Roland MertelsmannChapter 49 Hematopoietic Cell Donor Registries (pages 624–631): Jeffrey W. ChellChapter 50 Graft?vs.?Host Disease (pages 633–664): Keith M. SullivanChapter 51 Bacterial Infections (pages 665–682): John R. Wingard and Helen L. LeatherChapter 52 Fungal Infections After Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 683–700): Janice (Wes) M. Y. BrownChapter 53 Cytomegalovirus Infection (pages 701–726): John A. ZaiaChapter 54 Herpes Simplex Virus Infections (pages 727–731): James I. ItoChapter 55 Varicella?Zoster Virus Infections (pages 732–748): Ann M. ArvinChapter 56 Epstein?Barr Virus Infection (pages 749–756): Richard F. AmbinderChapter 57 Other Viral Infections After Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 757–768): Michael BoeckhChapter 58 Gastrointestinal and Hepatic Complications (pages 769–810): Simone I. Strasser and George B. McdonaldChapter 59 Neurological Complications of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 811–823): Harry OpenshawChapter 60 Blood Group Incompatibilities and Hemolytic Complications of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 824–832): Margaret R. O’DonnellChapter 61 Principles of Transfusion Support Before and After Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 833–852): Jeffrey McculloughChapter 62 Immunological Reconstitution Following Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 853–861): Robertson Parkman and Kenneth I. WeinbergChapter 63 Vaccination of Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients (pages 862–872): Clare A. DykewiczChapter 64 Pulmonary Complications After Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 873–882): David A. HorakChapter 65 Nutritional Support of Hematopoietic Cell Recipients (pages 883–893): Sally Weisdorf?Schindele and Sarah Jane SchwarzenbergChapter 66 Pain Management (pages 894–910): Jonathan R. Gavrin and F. Peter BuckleyChapter 67 Oral Complications (pages 911–928): Mark M. Schubert, Douglas E. Peterson and Michele E. LloidChapter 68 Growth and Development After Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 929–943): Jean E. SandersChapter 69 Delayed Complications After Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 944–961): Mary E. D. Flowers and H. Joachim DeegChapter 70 Secondary Malignancies After Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 962–977): Smita Bhatia and Ravi BhatiaChapter 71 Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Aplastic Anemia (pages 979–1001): George E. Georges and Rainer StorbChapter 72 Allogeneic Transplantation for Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria (pages 1002–1006): Robert P. WitherspoonChapter 73 Allogeneic Transplantation for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (pages 1007–1017): Frederick R. AppelbaumChapter 74 Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (pages 1018–1024): Robert A. KranceChapter 75 Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Adult Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia (pages 1025–1039): Keith E. Stockerl?Goldstein and Karl G. BlumeChapter 76 Allogeneic Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Children (pages 1040–1054): David A. Margolis and James T. CasperChapter 77 Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Adults (pages 1055–1066): Stephen J. FormanChapter 78 Allogeneic Transplantation for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Children (pages 1067–1083): Stella M. Davies, Norma K. C. Ramsay and John H. KerseyChapter 79 Allogeneic Transplantation for Myelodysplastic and Myeloproliferative Disorders (pages 1084–1095): Jeanne E. AndersonChapter 80 Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Multiple Myeloma (pages 1096–1104): David G. Maloney and Gosta GahrtonChapter 81 Allogeneic Transplantation for Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (pages 1105–1115): Issa Khouri and Richard ChamplinChapter 82 Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation from HLA Partially Matched Related Donors (pages 1116–1131): Claudio Anasetti and Andrea VelardiChapter 83 Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation from Unrelated Donors (pages 1132–1149): Effie W. PetersdorfChapter 84 Management of Relapse After Allogeneic Transplantation (pages 1150–1163): Robert H. CollinsChapter 85 Nonmyeloablative Therapy and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Hematologic Disorders (pages 1164–1176): Brenda M. Sandmaier and Rainer StorbChapter 86 Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Solid Tumors (pages 1177–1187): Richard W. Childs and Ramaprasad SrinivasanChapter 87 Autologous and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Hodgkin’s Disease (pages 1189–1206): Philip J. Bierman and Auayporn NademaneeChapter 88 Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Non?Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (pages 1207–1220): Sandra J. Horning and James O. ArmitageChapter 89 Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia (pages 1221–1237): Anthony S. Stein and Stephen J. FormanChapter 90 Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (pages 1238–1249): Charles A. LinkerChapter 91 Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (pages 1250–1261): Ravi Bhatia and Philip B. McglaveChapter 92 Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Multiple Myeloma (pages 1262–1282): Laurence Catley and Kenneth AndersonChapter 93 Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for AL Amyloidosis (pages 1283–1297): Raymond L. Comenzo and Morie A. GertzChapter 94 Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Breast Cancer (pages 1298–1307): Karen H. AntmanChapter 95 Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Germ Cell Tumors (pages 1308–1319): Brandon Hayes?Lattin and Craig R. NicholsChapter 96 Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Ovarian Carcinoma (pages 1320–1332): Patrick J. StiffChapter 97 Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Neuroblastoma (pages 1333–1344): Katherine K. MatthayChapter 98 Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Brain Tumors (pages 1345–1353): Ira J. Dunkel and Jonathan L. FinlayChapter 99 Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Pediatric Patients With Solid Tumors (pages 1354–1368): Allen R. Chen and Curt I. CivinChapter 100 AIDS and Hematopoietic Transplantation: HIV Infection, AIDS, Lymphoma and Gene Therapy (pages 1369–1384): John A. Zaia, J. Scott Cairns and John J. RossiChapter 101 Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Autoimmune Diseases (pages 1385–1393): Alan Tyndall and Alois GratwohlChapter 102 Prevention and Therapy of Relapse Following Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (pages 1394–1405): Robert S. NegrinChapter 103 Marrow Transplantation in Thalassemia (pages 1407–1416): Guido Lucarelli and Reginald A. CliftChapter 104 Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Sickle Cell Disease (pages 1417–1429): Mark C. WaltersChapter 105 Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Immunodeficiency Diseases (pages 1430–1442): Trudy N. Small, Wilhelm Friedrich and Richard J. O’ReillyChapter 106 Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Osteopetrosis (pages 1443–1454): Peter F. CocciaChapter 107 Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Storage Diseases (pages 1455–1470): Charles PetersChapter 108 Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Macrophage and Granulocyte Disorders (pages 1471–1482): Rajni AgarwalChapter 109 Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Fanconi Anemia (pages 1483–1504): John E. Wagner, Margaret L. Macmillan and Arleen D. AuerbachChapter 110 Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in the 21st Century (pages 1505–1510): Ernest Beutler

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Textbook of Hepatology: From Basic Science to Clinical Practice, Third Edition

 Miscellaneous  Comments Off on Textbook of Hepatology: From Basic Science to Clinical Practice, Third Edition
Feb 032019
 

THE encyclopedic guide to hepatology – for consultation by clinicians and basic scientistsPreviously the Oxford Textbook of Clinical Hepatology, this two-volume textbook is now with Blackwell Publishing. It covers basic, clinical and translational science (converting basic science discoveries into the practical applications to benefit people).Edited by ten leading experts in the liver and biliary tract and their diseases, along with outstanding contributions from over 200 international clinicians, this text has global references, evidence and extensive subject matter – giving you the best science and clinical practice discussed by the best authors.It includes unique sections on:Symptoms and signs in liver disease Industrial diseases affecting the liver The effects of diseases of other systems on the liver The effects of liver diseases on other systemsIt’s bigger and more extensive than other books and discusses new areas in more depth such as stem cells, genetics, genomics, proteomics, transplantation, mathematics and much more.Plus, it comes with a fully searchable CD ROM of the entire content.Click here to view a sample chapter on the liver and coagulationContent: Chapter 1.1 Macroscopic Anatomy of the Liver (pages 1–8): Jean H.D. Fasel, Holger Bourquain, Heinz?Otto Peitgen and Pietro E. MajnoChapter 1.2 Liver and Biliary Tract Histology (pages 9–19): Paulette Bioulac?Sage, Brigitte Le Bail and Charles BalabaudChapter 1.3 Ultrastructure of the Hepatocyte (pages 20–28): Zahida Khan, James M. Crawford and Donna B. StolzChapter 1.4 Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells (pages 29–35): David Semela and Vijay H. ShahChapter 1.5 Kupffer Cells (pages 36–42): Hartmut JaeschkeChapter 1.6 The Hepatic Stellate Cell (pages 43–51): Massimo PinzaniChapter 1.7 Biliary Epithelial Cells (pages 52–57): Jean?Francois DufourChapter 1.8 Hepatic Stem Cells (pages 58–64): Tania RoskamsChapter 1.9 Embryology of the Liver and Intrahepatic Biliary Tract (pages 65–71): Frederic P. LemaigreChapter 2.1 Hepatic Circulation (pages 73–88): Christophe Bureau, Jean?Marie Peron, Jean?Pierre Vinel, Yoshiya Ito, Robert S. McCuskey, Glen A. Laine and Charles S. CoxChapter 2.2 Functions of the Liver (pages 89–128): Paulo Renato, A. V. Correa, Michael H. Nathanson, Allan W. Wolkoff, Phyllis M. Novikoff, Sundararajah Thevananther, Saul J. Karpen, Ronald P.J.Oude Elferink, Gerhard P. Puschel and Bruno StiegerChapter 2.3 Metabolism (pages 129–249): Guenther Boden, Erez F. Scapa, Keishi Kanno, David E. Cohen, Margaret E. Brosnan, John T. Brosnan, Dominique Pessayre, Namita Roy?Chowdhury, Yang Lu, Jayanta Roy?Chowdhury, Peter L.M. Jansen, Klaas Nico Faber, Dieter Haussinger, Vishwanath R. Lingappa, Jose C. Fernandez?Checa, Carmen Garcia?Ruiz, Herve Puy, Jean?Charles Deybach, Masataka Okuno, Rie Matsushima?Nishiwaki, Soichi Kojima, Kyle E. Brown, George J. Brewer, Edward D. Harris, Fred K. Askari, Brent A. Neuschwander?Tetri, Chris Liddle and Catherine A.M. StedmanChapter 2.4 Synthetic Function (pages 250–273): Richard A. Weisiger, Maria T. DeSancho, Stephen M. Pastores and Rebecca G. WellsChapter 2.5 Regulation of the Liver Cell Mass (pages 274–289): Nisar P. Malek, K. Lenhard Rudolph and Anna Mae DiehlChapter 2.6 Excretion (pages 290–311): Martin Wagner, Michael Trauner, Mayank Bhandari and James ToouliChapter 2.7 Immunology of the Liver (pages 312–331): Tom Luedde, Christian Trautwein, Wajahat Z. Mehal, Alvin B. Imaeda and Wajahat Z. MehalChapter 3.1 Hepatocyte Apoptosis and Necrosis (pages 333–347): Henning Schulze?Bergkamen, Marcus Schuchmann and Peter R. GalleChapter 3.2 Ischaemia?Reperfusion Injury to the Liver (pages 348–355): Nazia Selzner and Pierre A. ClavienChapter 3.3 Genetics and Liver Diseases (pages 356–383): Hongjin Huang, Ramsey Cheung, Peter T. Donaldson and Frank LammertChapter 3.4 Cellular Cholestasis (pages 384–390): Stefano FiorucciChapter 3.5 Oncogenes and Tumour Suppressor Genes (pages 391–397): Dipankar Chattopadhyay and Helen ReevesChapter 3.6 Genomics, Gene Arrays and Proteomics in the Study of Liver Disease (pages 398–420): Geoffrey W. McCaughan, Nicholas A. Shackel, Rohan Williams, Devanshi Seth, Paul S. Haber and Mark D. GorrellChapter 4.1 Histological Features (pages 421–432): Valeer J. Desmet, Tania Roskams and Miguel BrugueraChapter 4.2 Classifications, Scoring Systems and Morphometry in Liver Pathology (pages 433–440): Pierre Bedossa and Valerie ParadisChapter 5.1 Signs and Symptoms of Liver Disease (pages 441–450): Jurg ReichenChapter 5.2 Biochemical Investigations in the Management of Liver Disease (pages 451–467): Igino Rigato, J. Donald Ostrow and Claudio TiribelliChapter 5.3 Hepatic Removal Kinetics: Importance for Quantitative Measurements of Liver Function (pages 468–478): Susanne Keiding and Michael SorensenChapter 5.4 Immunological Investigations in Liver Diseases (pages 479–488): Elmar Jaeckel and Michael P. MannsChapter 5.5 Biopsy and Laparoscopy (pages 489–499): Arthur ZimmermannChapter 5.6 Imaging of the Liver (pages 500–548): Luigi Bolondi, Valeria Camaggi, Fabio Piscaglia, Daniel T. Cohen, Dushyant V. Sahani, Christoforos Stoupis, Sanjeeva P. Kalva, Dushyant V. Sahani, Alan J. Wigg and James ToouliChapter 5.7 Interventional Radiology in Hepatobiliary Diseases (pages 549–560): Jose Ignacio Bilbao Jaureguizar, Concepcio Bru, Joan Falco Fages and Lluis DonosoChapter 5.8 Positron Emission Tomography of the Liver (pages 561–566): Michael Sorensen and Susanne KeidingChapter 5.9 Splanchnic Haemodynamic Investigations (pages 567–571): Didier Lebrec and Richard MoreauChapter 5.10 The Cochrane Hepatobiliary Group (pages 572–579): Christian GluudChapter 6.1 The Evolution of Cirrhosis (pages 581–589): John P. Iredale and I. Neil GuhaChapter 6.2 Cellular and Molecular Pathobiology of Liver Fibrosis and its Pharmacological Intervention (pages 590–603): Scott L. FriedmanChapter 6.3 Clinical and Diagnostic Aspects of Cirrhosis (pages 604–619): I. Neil Guha and John P. IredaleChapter 7.1 Anatomy of the Portal Venous System in Portal Hypertension (pages 621–629): J. Michael HendersonChapter 7.2 Pathogenesis of Portal Hypertension (pages 630–639): Roberto J. Groszmann and Juan G. AbraldesChapter 7.3 Clinical Manifestations and Management of Bleeding Episodes in Cirrhotics (pages 640–657): Jaime Bosch, Juan G. Abraldes and Juan Carlos Garcia?PaganChapter 7.4 Haemodynamic Assessment of Portal Hypertension (pages 658–665): Juan Carlos Garcia?Pagan, Juan Turnes and Jaime BoschChapter 7.5 Pathogenesis, Diagnosis and Treatment of Ascites in Cirrhosis (pages 666–710): Vicente Arroyo, Carlos Terra and Luis Ruiz?del?ArbolChapter 7.6 Hepatorenal Syndrome (pages 711–719): Pere Gines and Monica GuevaraChapter 7.7 Pulmonary Complications of Portal Hypertension (pages 720–727): Michael J. KrowkaChapter 7.8 Hepatic Encephalopathy (pages 728–760): J. Michael HendersonChapter 7.9 Bacterial Infections in Portal Hypertension (pages 761–770): Javier Fernandez and Miguel NavasaChapter 7.10 Hypersplenism (pages 771–778): P. Aiden McCormickChapter 8.1 Congenital Conditions (pages 779–809): Jean?Pierre Benhamou, Valerie Vilgrain, Valerie Vilgrain, Valerie Vilgrain, Valerie Vilgrain, Valerie Vilgrain, Jean?Pierre Benhamou, Jean?Pierre Benhamou and Jean?Francois CadranelChapter 8.2 Acquired Conditions (pages 810–817): Jean?Francois CadranelChapter 9.1 Viral Hepatitis (pages 819–956): Mario Rizzetto and Fabien ZoulimChapter 9.2 Systemic Virosis Producing Hepatitis (pages 957–973): Alberto Biglino and Mario RizzettoChapter 9.3 Human Immunodeficiency Virus and the Liver (pages 974–987): Vincent Soriano, Pablo Barreiro, Javier Garcia?Samaniego, Luz Martin?Carbonero and Marina NunezChapter 9.4 Exotic Virus Infections of the Liver (pages 988–998): Pierre E. Rollin, Thomas G. Ksiazek, Alberto Queiroz Farias and Flair Jose CarrilhoChapter 10.1 Bacterial, Rickettsial and Spirochaetal Infections (pages 999–1010): Jose M. Sanchez?TapiasChapter 10.2 Fungal Infections Affecting the Liver (pages 1011–1019): Roderick J. HayChapter 10.3 Protozoal Infections Affecting the Liver (pages 1020–1039): David Kershenobich, Guillermo Robles Diaz, Juan Miguel Abdo, Montse Renom, Pedro L. Alonso and Manuel CorachanChapter 10.4 Helminthiasis (pages 1040–1067): Flair Carrilho, Pedro Paulo Chieffi, Luiz Caetano Da Silva, S. Bresson?Hadni, G.A. Mantion, J.P Miguet, D.A. Vuitton, Marcelo Simao Ferreira and Edna StraussChapter 11.1 Primary Biliary Cirrhosis (pages 1069–1088): E. Jenny Heathcote and Piotr MilkiewiczChapter 11.2 Autoimmune Hepatitis (pages 1089–1102): Diego Vergani and Giorgina Mieli?VerganiChapter 11.3 Sclerosing Cholangitis (pages 1103–1110): Konstantinos N. Lazaridis and Nicholas F. LaRussoChapter 11.4 Vanishing Bile Duct Syndrome (pages 1111–1119): Frank Grunhage and Tilman SauerbruchChapter 11.5 Overlap Syndromes (pages 1120–1126): Ulrich BeuersChapter 12.1 Epidemiological Aspects of Alcoholic Liver Disease (pages 1127–1134): Juan CaballeriaChapter 12.2 Ethanol Metabolism and Pathogenesis of Alcoholic Liver Injury (pages 1135–1147): Stephen F. Stewart and Chris P. DayChapter 12.3 Pathology of Alcoholic Liver Disease (pages 1148–1156): Elie Serge ZafraniChapter 12.4 Alcoholic Liver Disease: Natural History, Diagnosis, Clinical Features, Evaluation, Prognosis and Management (pages 1157–1178): Laurent Spahr and Antoine HadengueChapter 12.5 Management of the Alcoholic Patient, Including Alcoholism and Extrahepatic Manifestations (pages 1179–1191): Georges?Philippe Pageaux and Pascal PerneyChapter 13 Non?Alcoholic Fatty Liver and Non?Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (pages 1193–1208): Geoffrey C. FarrellChapter 14.1 Drug?Induced Liver Injury (pages 1209–1268): Dominique Pessayre and Dominique LarreyChapter 14.2 Toxic Liver Injury (pages 1269–1276): Basuki Gunawan and Neil KaplowitzChapter 14.3 Hepatic Injury Due to Physical Agents (pages 1277–1280): Bernhard H. Lauterburg and Haithem ChtiouiChapter 14.4 Hepatic Toxicity Induced by Herbal Medicines (pages 1281–1288): Felix Stickel and Detlef SchuppanChapter 15 Acute Liver Failure and Related Syndromes (pages 1289–1312): Francois Durand and Jacques BernuauChapter 16.1 Wilson’s Disease (pages 1313–1322): Michael SchilskyChapter 16.2 Haemochromatosis (pages 1323–1329): Antonello PietrangeloChapter 16.3 Alpha?1?Antitrypsin Deficiency and Related Disorders (pages 1330–1335): Jeffrey H. TeckmanChapter 16.4 The Liver in Cystic Fibrosis (pages 1336–1342): Andrew P. FeranchakChapter 16.5 Human Hereditary Porphyrias (pages 1343–1351): Elisabeth Irene Minder and Xiaoye Schneider?YinChapter 16.6 Hyperbilirubinaemia (pages 1352–1359): Peter L.M. JansenChapter 16.7 The Liver in Intracellular and Extracellular Lipidosis (pages 1360–1369): Dominique P. GermainChapter 16.8 Glycogen Storage Diseases (pages 1370–1376): Philippe LabruneChapter 16.9 Mitochondriopathies (pages 1377–1382): Pierre RustinChapter 16.10 Genetic Cholestatic Diseases (pages 1383–1388): Ronald P.J. Oude ElferinkChapter 17.1 Hepatic Artery Diseases (pages 1389–1394): Peter C. HayesChapter 17.2 Obstruction of the Portal Vein (pages 1395–1402): Juan Carlos Garcia?Pagan, Manuel Hernandez?Guerra and Jaime BoschChapter 17.3 Disorders of the Hepatic Veins and Hepatic Sinusoids (pages 1403–1417): Dominique?Charles VallaChapter 17.4 Congenital Vascular Malformations (pages 1418–1423): Guadalupe Garcia?TsaoChapter 18.1 Benign Hepatic Tumours (pages 1425–1436): Jean?Pierre Benhamou, Massimo Colombo and Riccardo LencioniChapter 18.2 Malignant Tumours (pages 1437–1463): Jordi Bruix, Alejandro Forner, Maria Varela, Carmen Ayuso, Josep Maria Llovet, Miguel Bruguera and Juan RodesChapter 18.3 Metastatic Tumours (pages 1464–1478): Masamichi Kojiro, Antoni Castells and Humphrey J.F. HodgsonChapter 19.1 Intrahepatic Cholestasis (pages 1479–1500): Olivier Chazouilleres and Chantal HoussetChapter 19.2 Extrahepatic Biliary Obstruction: Systemic Effects, Diagnosis and Management (pages 1501–1517): Michelle C. Gallagher and James S. DooleyChapter 19.3 Gallstone Disease (pages 1518–1540): Frank Lammert, Franz?Ludwig Dumoulin and Tilman SauerbruchChapter 19.4 Cholangitis and Biliary Tract Infections (pages 1541–1549): Ulrich BeuersChapter 19.5 Haemobilia (pages 1550–1560): Antonio Lacy and Nader K. FrancisChapter 19.6 Biliary Dyskinesia (pages 1561–1572): C. Ritchie Chalmers and Giles J. ToogoodChapter 19.7 Benign Biliary Tumours (pages 1573–1574): Miguel BrugueraChapter 19.8 Gallbladder Carcinoma (pages 1575–1582): Thomas A. Aloia, Christopher H. Crane and Jean?Nicolas VautheyChapter 19.9 Cholangiocarcinoma (pages 1583–1605): Steven M. Strasberg and William G. HawkinsChapter 20.1 The Liver in Cardiovascular Disease (pages 1607–1615): Susan Tiukinhoy?Laing, Andres T. Blei and Mihai GheorghiadeChapter 20.2 The Liver in Lung Diseases (pages 1616–1621): Andres T. Blei and Jacob I. SznajderChapter 20.3 The Effect of Gastrointestinal Diseases on the Liver and Biliary Tract (pages 1622–1633): Roger W. Chapman and Peter W. AngusChapter 20.4 Total Parenteral Nutrition?Related Liver Disease (pages 1634–1641): Sean W.P. Koppe and Alan L. BuchmanChapter 20.5 The Effect of Skin Diseases on the Liver (pages 1642–1652): Daniel Glass and Malcolm RustinChapter 20.6 The Liver in Urogenital Diseases (pages 1653–1661): Monica Guevara, Vicente Arroyo and Juan RodesChapter 20.7 The Effect of Haematological and Lymphatic Diseases on the Liver (pages 1662–1670): Miguel Bruguera and Rosa MiquelChapter 20.8 The Liver in Graft?vs.?Host Disease (pages 1671–1679): Enric Carreras, Carmen Martinez and Miguel BrugueraChapter 20.9 The Effect of Endocrine Diseases on Liver Function (pages 1680–1693): Anthony J. DeSantis and Andres T. BleiChapter 20.10 Musculoskeletal Diseases and the Liver (pages 1694–1701): N. Guanabens, J. Van Den Bogaerde and H.L.C. BeynonChapter 20.11 Amyloidosis (pages 1702–1708): Philip N. HawkinsChapter 20.12 Hepatic Granulomas (pages 1709–1717): Laura M. Kulik and Andres T. BleiChapter 21.1 The Effect of Liver Disease on the Cardiovascular System (pages 1719–1731): Jens H. Henriksen and Soren MollerChapter 21.2 The Effect of Liver Disease on the Endocrine System (pages 1732–1766): Yolanta T. Kruszynska and Pierre M. BoulouxChapter 21.3 Haematological Abnormalities in Liver Disease (pages 1767–1779): Marco Senzolo and Andrew K. BurroughsChapter 21.4 Haemostasis in Liver Disease (pages 1780–1797): Stephen H. Caldwell, Patrick G. Northup and Vinay SundaramChapter 21.5 The Effect of Liver Disease on the Gastrointestinal Tract (pages 1798–1803): Roger W. Chapman and Peter W. AngusChapter 21.6 The Effect of Liver Disease on the Skin (pages 1804–1814): Malcolm Rustin and Daniel GlassChapter 21.7 The Effect of Liver Disease on the Urogenital Tract (pages 1815–1821): Monica Guevara, Vicente Arroyo and Juan RodesChapter 21.8 The Nervous System in Liver Disease (pages 1822–1828): Andres T. BleiChapter 21.9 The Effect of Liver Disease on Bone (pages 1829–1835): Juliet CompstonChapter 21.10 The Effect of Liver Disease on Nutritional Status and Energy Metabolism (pages 1836–1842): Michael R. CharltonChapter 22.1 Paediatric Liver Diseases (pages 1843–1869): Marianne Samyn and Giorgina Mieli?VerganiChapter 22.2 Liver Diseases in the Elderly (pages 1870–1878): Oliver F.W. JamesChapter 22.3 Liver Diseases and Pregnancy (pages 1879–1895): Andrew K. Burroughs and Evangelos CholongitasChapter 23.1 The General Management of Liver Diseases (pages 1897–1904): Dominique GuyaderChapter 23.2 Nutritional Aspects of Liver and Biliary Disease (pages 1905–1911): Bernard CampilloChapter 23.3 Prescribing Drugs in Liver Disease (pages 1912–1921): Dominique Larrey and Georges?Philippe PageauxChapter 23.4 Management of Pretransplant Patients (pages 1922–1930): Francois DurandChapter 24.1 General Surgical Aspects and the Risks of Liver Surgery in Patients with Hepatic Disease (pages 1931–1937): Jacques Belghiti and Satoshi OgataChapter 24.2 Anaesthesia and Liver Disease (pages 1938–1944): Kalpana Reddy and Susan V. MallettChapter 24.3 Postoperative Jaundice (pages 1945–1952): Peter Fickert and Michael TraunerChapter 24.4 Hepatobiliary Trauma (pages 1953–1961): K. Raj Prasad, Patrick A. Coughlin and Giles J. ToogoodChapter 25.1 Surgical Techniques (pages 1963–1983): Peter Neuhaus, Ramon Charco, Josp Fuster Obregon, Constantino Fondevila, Juan Carlos Garcia?Valdecasas, Igal Kam, James Trotter and Gregory T. EversonChapter 25.2 Liver Transplantation: Indications, Contraindications and Results (pages 1984–1995): Gregory T. Everson and Fernando E. MembrenoChapter 25.3 The Perioperative Care and Complications of Liver Transplantation (pages 1996–2002): Mark T. Keegan and David J. PlevakChapter 25.4 Immunosuppression (pages 2003–2009): James NeubergerChapter 25.5 Recurrent Disease and Management in Liver Transplantation (pages 2010–2018): Xavier Forns and Antoni RimolaChapter 25.6 Post?Transplantation Management and Complications (pages 2019–2026): Faouzi Saliba and Didier SamuelChapter 25.7 Liver Transplantation and Quality of Life (pages 2027–2031): Miguel Navasa and Juan RodesChapter 25.8 Emerging Therapies (pages 2032–2052): Govardhana Rao Yannam, Jayanta Roy?Chowdhury, Ira J. Fox, Vanessa Stadlbauer and Rajiv JalanChapter 26.1 Models in Clinical Hepatology (pages 2053–2064): W. Ray KimChapter 26.2 Outcomes Research in Hepatology (pages 2065–2072): Raymond S. KoffChapter 26.3 Meta?Analysis (pages 2073–2079): Gioacchino Leandro and Andrew K. BurroughsChapter 26.4 Economic Considerations in Hepatology (pages 2080–2087): John B. WongChapter 26.5 Development of the Liver Interactome: Mapping the Regulatory Networks (pages 2088–2095): Mario Pagano, Susana Neves, Ravi Iyengar and John Cijiang He
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Stephens’ Detection and Evaluation of Adverse Drug Reactions: Principles and Practice, Sixth Edition

 Miscellaneous  Comments Off on Stephens’ Detection and Evaluation of Adverse Drug Reactions: Principles and Practice, Sixth Edition
Feb 032019
 

The detection and evaluation of adverse drug reactions is crucial for understanding the safety of medicines and for preventing harm in patients. Not only is it necessary to detect new adverse drug reactions, but the principles and practice of pharmacovigilance apply to the surveillance of a wide range of medicinal products. Stephens’ Detection and Evaluation of Adverse Drug Reactions provides a comprehensive review of all aspects of adverse drug reactions throughout the life cycle of a medicine, from toxicology and clinical trials through to pharmacovigilance, risk management, and legal and regulatory requirements. It also covers the safety of biotherapeutics and vaccines and includes new chapters on pharmacogenetics, proactive risk management, societal considerations, and the safety of drugs used in oncology and herbal medicines. This sixth edition of the classic text on drug safety is an authoritative reference text for all those who work in pharmacovigilance or have an interest in adverse drug reactions, whether in regulatory authorities, pharmaceutical companies, or academia. Praise for previous editions “This book presents a comprehensive and wide-ranging overview of the science of pharmacovigilance. For those entering or already experienced in the pharmaceutical sciences, this is an essential work.” – from a review in E-STREAMS “…a key text in the area of pharmacovigilance…extensively referenced and well-written…a valuable resource…” – from a review in The Pharmaceutical JournalContent: Chapter 1 Adverse Drug Reactions: History, Terminology, Classification, Causality, Frequency, Preventability (pages 1–119): Jeffrey K. AronsonChapter 2 Pharmacogenetics of Adverse Drug Reactions (pages 121–156): Sudeep P. Pushpakom and Munir PirmohamedChapter 3 Toxicology and Adverse Drug Reactions (pages 157–214): D. J. Snodin and A. SuittersChapter 4 Clinical Trials—Collecting Safety Data and Establishing the Adverse Drug Reactions Profile (pages 215–289): John Talbot, Marianne Keisu and Lars StahleChapter 5 Clinical Laboratory Safety Data (pages 291–348): Alan CraigChapter 6 Statistics: Analysis and Presentation of Safety Data (pages 349–388): Stephen J. W. Evans and Dorothea NitschChapter 7 Proactive Pharmacovigilance and Risk Management (pages 389–409): June Raine, Lesley Wise, John Talbot and Jeffrey K. AronsonChapter 8 Regulatory Aspects of Pharmacovigilance (pages 411–509): Kristina Leila Strutt and Barry David Charles ArnoldChapter 9 Legal Aspects of Pharmacovigilance in the European Union (pages 511–543): Christine H. BendallChapter 10 Dictionaries and Coding in Pharmacovigilance (pages 545–572): E. G. Brown and J. E. HarrisonChapter 11 Adverse Drug Reactions: Societal Considerations (pages 573–584): Nicky BrittenChapter 12 Safety of Biotherapeutics (pages 585–601): Andrew Erdman, James Nickas and Benton BrownChapter 13 Vaccine Safety Surveillance (pages 603–624): E. Miller and J. StoweChapter 14 Assessing the Safety of Drugs Used in Oncology (pages 625–643): Anne KehelyChapter 15 Adverse Drug Reactions and Pharmacovigilance of Herbal Medicines (pages 645–683): Joanne Barnes
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Steroid Chemistry at a Glance

 Miscellaneous  Comments Off on Steroid Chemistry at a Glance
Feb 032019
 

The term steroid has become virtually synonymous with drug abuse in sport to the majority of the public. However these steroids – androgens – actually comprise only a single relatively small class of biologically active steroids, and are overshadowed by a large collection of compounds, a sizeable number of which are commercial drugs that share the same structural carbon skeleton. The development of these drugs has led to a large body of organic chemistry often denoted as “Steroid Chemistry”. Steroid Chemistry At A Glance provides a concise overview of the main principles and reactions of steroid chemistry. Topics covered include: history, isolation and structure determination of steroids steroid nomenclature and stereochemistrynatural sources of steroidssynthesis and reactions of aromatic a-ring steroids, androstanes, and pregnanes steroids with a spirolactone at position 17steroids with hetrocyclic ring Acompounds derived from cholesterolBased on the highly successful and student friendly “at a glance” approach, the information is presented in integrated, self contained double page spreads of text and illustrative material. Students of chemistry and pharmacy using Steroid Chemistry at a Glance will find they have a resource with which they can quickly, concisely and confidently acquire, regularly review and revise the basic facts that underpin the properties, synthesis and reactions of this important class of natural products. It will also serve as a handy bench reference for postgraduates and professional chemists. Content: Chapter 1 Steroids: A Brief History (pages 10–18): Chapter 2 Sources of Steroids (pages 20–26): Chapter 3 Estranes: Steroids in Which Ring A is Aromatic (pages 28–46): Chapter 4 Gonanes or 19?Nor?Steroids (pages 48–67): Chapter 5 Androstanes, C19 Steroids and their Derivatives (pages 68–85): Chapter 6 Pregnanes, Part 1: Progestins (pages 86–101): Chapter 7 Pregnanes, Part 2: Corticosteroids (pages 102–120): Chapter 8 Miscellaneous Steroids (pages 122–134):
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Staged Diabetes Management: A Systematic Approach, Second Edition

 Endocrinology/Metabolism/Diabetes Mellitus  Comments Off on Staged Diabetes Management: A Systematic Approach, Second Edition
Feb 022019
 

Using evidence-based medicine, this title addresses the prominent issues of primary care diabetes management. It provides practical solutions to the detection and treatment of diabetes, its complications and such new areas as metabolic syndrome, pre-diabetes and diabetes in children. The text reviews the fundamental basis of diabetes management and then addresses treatment of each type of diabetes and the major micro- and macrovascular complications. This Revised Second Edition uniquely focuses on advanced technologies and advanced therapeutics. Key changes include: Integration of incretin hormones in the basic pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes; Incretin mimetics and potentiators; Revised clinical decision paths with new medications and advanced insulin algorithms; New section on continuous glucose monitoring. Staged Diabetes Management: A Systematic Approach, Second Edition, Revised presents a clear set of clinical algorithms consistent with the EASD/ADA recommended algorithms. It provides a means of applying the principles using a proven methodology and one that has been applied internationally. Based on the highly successful diabetes programmes for primary care developed by the world-renowned International Diabetes Center in Minneapolis, USA Features Decision Paths and Practice Guidelines to facilitate clinical decision making Clearly written and illustrated: each chapter may be read alone but complements the others to give a broad view of diabetes care This title is an invaluable guide for healthcare professionals, particularly primary care physicians, diabetes specialist nurses, and for all those with an interest in diabetes. It is also useful for all Diabetes educators and medical students.Content: Chapter 1 Introduction to Staged Diabetes Management (pages 1–25): Chapter 2 The Implementation of Staged Diabetes Management (pages 27–48): Chapter 3 Therapeutic Principles for the Treatment of Diabetes (pages 49–75): Chapter 4 Type 2 Diabetes (pages 77–154): Chapter 5 Type 2 Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome in Children and Adolescents (pages 155–216): Chapter 6 Type 1 Diabetes (pages 217–256): Chapter 7 Pregestational and Gestational Diabetes (pages 257–292): Chapter 8 Macrovascular Disease (pages 295–317): Chapter 9 Microvascular Complications (pages 319–367): Chapter 10 Hospitalization (pages 369–384):
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Statistical Development of Quality in Medicine

 Statistics  Comments Off on Statistical Development of Quality in Medicine
Feb 022019
 

The promotion of standards and guidelines to advance quality assurance and control is an integral part of the health care sector. Quantitative methods are needed to monitor, control and improve the quality of medical processes. Statistical Development of Quality in Medicine presents the statistical concepts behind the application of industrial quality control methods. Filled with numerous case studies and worked examples, the text enables the reader to choose the relevant control chart, to critically apply it, improve it if necessary, and monitor its stability. Furthermore, the reader is provided with the necessary background to critically assess the literature on the application of control charts and risk adjustment and to apply the findings. Contains a user-friendly introduction, setting out the necessary statistical concepts used in the field. Uses numerous real-life case studies from the literature and the authors’ own research as the backbone of the text. Provides a supplementary website featuring problems and answers drawn from the book, alongside examples in Statgraphics. The accessible style of Statistical Development of in Clinical Medicine invites a large readership. It is primarily aimed at health care officials, and personnel responsible for developing and controlling the quality of health care services. However, it is also ideal for statisticians working with health care problems, diagnostic and pharmaceutical companies, and graduate students of quality control.Content: Chapter 1 Theory of Statistical Process Control (pages 9–36): Chapter 2 Shewhart Control Charts (pages 37–77): Chapter 3 Time?Weighted Control Charts (pages 78–91): Chapter 4 Control Charts for Autocorrelated Data (pages 92–109): Chapter 5 Tools for Risk Adjustment (pages 111–148): Chapter 6 Risk?Adjusted Control Charts (pages 149–163): Chapter 7 Risk?Adjusted Comparison of Healthcare Providers (pages 164–181): Chapter 8 Learning Curves (pages 183–194): Chapter 9 Assessing the Quality of Clinical Processes (pages 195–215):
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Principal Emergency Response and Preparedness: Requirements and Guidance

 Emergency  Comments Off on Principal Emergency Response and Preparedness: Requirements and Guidance
Feb 022019
 

Anticipating and planning your organization’s response to an emergency situation isn’t just a good idea: it’s a federal requirement. Since 1989, OSHA has issued numerous standards that explicitly require employers to have emergency action plans for their workplaces and dozens more regulating specific materials and processes that affect the health and safety of employees.

This book makes the task of identifying and understanding OSHA’s emergency response requirements virtually effortless by compiling and summarizing the most relevant requirements—53 general and 95 industry-specific—found in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 29 Parts 1910, 1915, 1917, 1918, 1926, and 1928.

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http://nitroflare.com/view/0D90F5203C6EA77/Principal_Emergency_Response_and_Preparedness.epub

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The Foundations of Iridology: The Eyes as the Key to Your Genetic Health Profile

 Genetics, Ophthalmology  Comments Off on The Foundations of Iridology: The Eyes as the Key to Your Genetic Health Profile
Feb 022019
 

A complete guide to decoding the iris to reveal health predispositions for prevention and early treatment

• Details the fundamental reflex signs of iridology and how to identify constitutional strengths and weaknesses in the stroma, pigments, and capillaries of the eyes as well as read energy patterns in pupil tone
• Explores the history and development of iridology from the 18th century to today
• Includes analysis of real case studies with full-color photos and illustrations

The iris of your eye is a personal and unique identifier that expresses much more about us than we can imagine. Through detailed observation of the irises’ stroma, pigments, and capillaries, you can determine a person’s constitutional strengths and weaknesses and gain insight into their genetic predisposition to certain illnesses as well as preventive and treatment options that would be most effective. By reading the iris, practitioners of natural medicine can interpret the signs that reveal a client’s lifestyle choices and use this knowledge to make enlightened decisions regarding the client’s health plan and how to help them realize their full potential.

In this full-color guide, Gustau Pau, an iridologist with more than 35 years of experience, details the chromatic scale and signs expressed in the eyes and how to use them to identify organs and their function as well as susceptibility to specific ailments. He explores the history and development of iridology from Hildegard von Bingen’s work on healing to 18th-century European scientists, including Ignaz von Peczely, the father of modern iridology. He reveals recent iridology developments on identifying genetically inherited physical traits, explaining how individuals can use this insight to make nutritional and lifestyle choices that will offset inherited weaknesses and bolster strengths. Focusing on the digestive system, he shows how the pupillary zone can reveal digestive function and demonstrates how diet is responsible for causing many diseases. The author also explores miasmas in the eyes, includes methods for reading energy patterns in pupil tone, and offers the scientific explanation for the old contention that the “eyes are the windows of the soul.”

Illustrating the fundamental signs that iridologists use for reference, Pau provides sample iridographies and real case studies with photos and diagrams. Explaining how scientific research on the eye has not yet caught up with the innovations of iridology, he shows how the eyes reveal both our internal state and future health and have a much broader role in the body that we are only now just discovering.

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