Free-Radical-Induced DNA Damage and Its Repair: A Chemical Perspective

 Miscellaneous  Comments Off on Free-Radical-Induced DNA Damage and Its Repair: A Chemical Perspective
Feb 132019
 

Understanding of the molecular basis of DNA damage and its repair has increased dramatically in recent years, and substantial knowledge now exists concerning the products arising from free-radical attack on DNA. Free-radical DNA damage may lead to mutations, cancer, and cell death. Free radicals have various sources, notably ionizing radiation and oxidative stress. In radiotherapy for cancer and with some anticancer drugs, use is made of cell death by excessive DNA damage. The mechanisms leading to products of free-radical attack which have been studied in models and with small double-stranded DNA fragments are discussed in detail, and the basics of the underlying free-radical chemistry are dealt with in separate chapters.
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Molecular Imaging: An Essential Tool in Preclinical Research, Diagnostic Imaging, and Therapy

 Radiology  Comments Off on Molecular Imaging: An Essential Tool in Preclinical Research, Diagnostic Imaging, and Therapy
Feb 132019
 

The continuous progress in the understanding of molecular processes of disease formation and progression attributes an increasing importance to biomedical molecular imaging methods. The purpose of this workshop was to discuss and overview multiple applications and emerging technologies in the area of diagnostic imaging including its fundamental capabilities in preclinical research, the opportunities for medical care, and the options involving therapeutic concepts. The book provides the reader with state-of-the-art information on the different aspects of diagnostic imaging, illuminating new developments in molecular biology, imaging agents and molecular probe design, and therapeutic techniques.

 

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Protein Arrays: Methods and Protocols

 Miscellaneous  Comments Off on Protein Arrays: Methods and Protocols
Feb 132019
 

Protein arrays make possible the detection and quantitation of many proteins simultaneously, thus enabling researchers to ask fundamental questions about biological processes and to discover biomarkers that can be used diagnostically. In Protein Arrays: Methods and Protocols, innovative experimentalists describe in detail the methods they have developed to synthesize and construct protein arrays for basic and clinical research. The authors present protocols to create and immobilize the capture substrate-the first task in designing a protein array-using a variety of affinity capture reagents, including antibodies, peptides, aptamers, biotin, chemical reagents, and chromatographic substrates. Once synthesized, these arrays can be used to analyze protein-protein interactions and posttranslational modifications, such as phosphorylation, as well as to discover and characterize potential diagnostic markers. Protocols to accomplish these tasks are also presented. The protocols presented follow the successful Methods in Molecular Biology™ series format, each one offering step-by-step laboratory instructions, an introduction outlining the principle behind the technique, lists of equipment and reagents, and tips on troubleshooting and avoiding known pitfalls. Diverse and highly practical, Protein Arrays: Methods and Protocols offers basic and clinical investigators a broad spectrum of approaches to the generation of protein arrays, as well as their uses in biomarkers discovery, in assay development, in clinical sample testing, in signal transduction analysis and characterization, and for creating the next generation of molecular tools.
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Lymph Node Metastasis in Gastrointestinal Cancer

 Gastroenterology/Hepatology, Oncology  Comments Off on Lymph Node Metastasis in Gastrointestinal Cancer
Feb 122019
 

This book provides the most comprehensive and up-to-date knowledge of lymph node micrometastasis (LMM) and sentinel node navigation surgery (SNNS) in gastrointestinal cancers.

Lymph node metastasis is a critically important prognostic factor in gastrointestinal tract cancers such as tumors of the esophagus, stomach, and colorectum. An understanding of the basic aspects of lymphatics and lymph nodes, including anatomy, histology, physiology, immunology, and molecular biology, is fundamental for physicians who are involved in cancer treatment. Furthermore, owing to the development of molecular and biological methodology, the precise recognition of LMM and its clinical significance have been clarified recently.

At the same time, SNNS has actually been anticipated in treatment of breast tumors, and it is now being introduced in gastrointestinal tract cancer. For the application of SNNS, the detection of lymph node metastasis including LMM is extremely significant, because the presence of LMM determines the direction for surgery and chemo and/or radiation therapy.

With these considerations in mind, the expert contributors to this book review basic and clinical approaches for LMM and SNNS including methodology for gastrointestinal cancers. Thus this volume benefits not only surgeons who treat gastrointestinal cancers but also clinical oncologists and medical scientists such as physiologists and pathologists.

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Phospholipid Metabolism in Apoptosis

 Endocrinology/Metabolism/Diabetes Mellitus  Comments Off on Phospholipid Metabolism in Apoptosis
Feb 122019
 

The last few years have witnessed an explosion of both interest and knowledge about apoptosis, the process by which a cell actively commits suicide. The number of publications on the topic has increased from nothing in the early 1980s to more than 10,000 papers annually today. It is now well recognized that apoptosis is essential in many aspects of normal development and is required for maintaining tissue homeostasis. The idea that life requires death seems somewhat paradoxical, but cell suicide is essential for an animal to survive. For example, without selective destruction of “non-self” T cells, an animal would lack immunity. Similarly, meaningful neural connections in the brain are whittled from a mass of cells. Further, developmental cell remodeling during tissue maturation involves programmed cell death as the major mechanism for functional and structural safe transition of undifferentiated cells to more specialized counterparts. Apoptosis research, with roots in biochemistry, developmental and cell biology, genetics, and immunology, embraces this long-ignored natural law. Failure to properly regulate apoptosis can have catastrophic consequences. Cancer and many diseases (AIDS, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, heart attack, stroke, etc. ) are thought to arise from deregulation of apoptosis. As apoptosis emerges as a key biological regulatory mechanism, it has become harder and harder to keep up with new developments in this field.
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Apoptotic Pathways as Targets for Novel Therapies in Cancer and Other Diseases

 Oncology  Comments Off on Apoptotic Pathways as Targets for Novel Therapies in Cancer and Other Diseases
Feb 122019
 

As our understanding of apoptotic pathway expands, we are coming to realize the great potential of utilizing this pathway to treat diseases such as cancer. The book attempts to review, summarize, and speculate on the apoptotic pathways, how are they regulated and how targeted therapies are being used to treat a wide variety of diseases. Special emphasis is placed on cancer since new treatments either being developed or currently in the clinical setting are showing great promise to increase survival rates for cancer patients. Chapters will address the biology behind regulating the apoptotic pathways and what goes wrong in disease states whereas other chapters will concentrate on new therapies targeting apoptotic pathways. The reader by the end of the book should have greater insight into the understanding and utilization of apoptotic pathways to fight diseases such as cancer.
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Critical Care Obstetrics, Fourth Edition

 Critical Care  Comments Off on Critical Care Obstetrics, Fourth Edition
Feb 122019
 

The fourth edition of Critical Care Obstetrics has been extensively revised to reflect the advances that have been made in maternal-fetal medicine. This edition contains 14 brand new chapters written by the field’s leading physicians. Critical Care Obstetrics, 4/e, offers expanded coverage in areas vital to intensive care management, including Neonatal Resuscitation, The Organ Transplant Obstetrical Patient, and Ethical Considerations This practical guide and reference will be of invaluable assistance to obstetricians, and primary care physicians, in both the treatment and referral of high-risk patients. Content: Chapter 1 Epidemiology of Critical Illness and Outcomes in Pregnancy (pages 2–12): Cande V. Ananth and John C. SmulianChapter 2 Organizing a Critical Care Obstetric Unit (pages 13–16): Cornelia R. GravesChapter 3 Pregnancy?Induced Physiologic Alterations (pages 19–42): Errol R. Norwitz, Julian N. Robinson and Fergal D. MaloneChapter 4 Maternal?Fetal Blood Gas Physiology (pages 43–59): Renee A. BobrowskiChapter 5 Fluid and Electrolyte Balance (pages 60–84): William E. Scorza and Anthony ScardellaChapter 6 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (pages 87–103): Nancy A. Hueppchen and Andrew J. SatinChapter 7 Neonatal Resuscitation (pages 104–120): Christian Con Yost and Ron BloomChapter 8 Airway Management in Critical Illness (pages 121–145): Janice E. WhittyChapter 9 Vascular Access (pages 146–161): Gayle Olson and Aristides KoutrouvelisChapter 10 Blood Component Replacement Therapy (pages 162–183): David A. SacksChapter 11 Hyperalimentation (pages 184–190): Jeffrey P. PhelanChapter 12 Dialysis (pages 191–198): Gail L. SeikenChapter 13 Cardiopulmonary Bypass (pages 199–210): Audrey S. Alleyne and Peter L. BaileyChapter 14 Noninvasive Monitoring (pages 211–218): John Anthony and Michael A. BelfortChapter 15 Pulmonary Artery Catheterization (pages 219–223): Gary A. Dildy and Steven L. ClarkChapter 16 Seizures and Status Epilepticus (pages 227–232): Tawnya Constantino and Michael W. VarnerChapter 17 Acute Spinal Cord Injury (pages 233–239): Sheryl Rodts?Palenik and James N. MartinChapter 18 Cerebrovascular Accidents (pages 240–251): Mark W. Tomlinson and Bernard GonikChapter 19 Cardiac Disease (pages 252–274): Michael R. FoleyChapter 20 Thromboembolic Disease (pages 275–297): Donna Dizon?Townson, Shailen S. Shah and Jeffrey P. PhelanChapter 21 Etiology and Management of Hemorrhage (pages 298–311): Rosie Burton and Michael A. BelfortChapter 22 Severe Acute Asthma (pages 312–328): William H. Barth and Theresa L. StewartChapter 23 Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (pages 329–345): Brian A. MasonChapter 24 Pulmonary Edema (pages 346–353): William C. MabieChapter 25 The Acute Abdomen (pages 354–360): Howard T. SharpChapter 26 Acute Pancreatitis (pages 361–371): Karen A. ZempolichChapter 27 Acute Renal Failure (pages 372–379): Shad H. Deering and Gail L. SeikenChapter 28 Acute Fatty Liver of Pregnancy (pages 380–385): T. Flint PorterChapter 29 Sickle?Cell Crisis (pages 386–393): Lisa E. Moore and James N. MartinChapter 30 Disseminated Intravascular Coagulopathy (pages 394–407): Luis Diego Pacheco, James W. Van Hook and Alfredo F. GeiChapter 31 Thrombotic Microangiopathies (pages 408–419): Christopher A. Sullivan and James N. MartinChapter 32 Endocrine Emergencies (pages 420–435): Carey L. Winkler and Lowell E. DavisChapter 33 Complications of Preeclampsia (pages 436–462): Gary A. DildyChapter 34 Anaphylactoid Syndrome of Pregnancy (Amniotic Fluid Embolism) (pages 463–471): Gary A. Dildy and Steven L. ClarkChapter 35 Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and the Antiphospholipid Syndrome (pages 472–483): T. Flint Porter and D. Ware BranchChapter 36 Trauma in Pregnancy (pages 484–505): James W. Van Hook, Alfredo F. Gei and Luis Diego PachecoChapter 37 Thermal and Electrical Injury (pages 506–511): Cornelia R. GravesChapter 38 Overdose, Poisoning, and Envenomation (pages 512–552): Alfredo F. Gei and Victor R. SuarezChapter 39 Hypovolemic and Cardiac Shock (pages 553–561): Scott RobertsChapter 40 Septic Shock (pages 562–580): Michael R. Leonardi and Bernard GonikChapter 41 Anaphylactic Shock (pages 581–589): Donna Dizon?TownsonChapter 42 Fetal Considerations in the Critically Ill Gravida (pages 593–611): Jeffrey P. Phelan, Cortney Kirkendall and Shailen S. ShahChapter 43 Fetal Effects of Drugs Commonly Used Critical Care (pages 612–619): Jerome YankowitzChapter 44 Anesthesia for the Critically Ill Parturient with Cardiac Disease and Pregnancy?Induced Hypertension (pages 620–637): Rakesh B. VadheraChapter 45 The Organ Transplant Obstetric Patient (pages 638–645): James R. ScottChapter 46 Ethics in the Obstetric Critical Care Setting (pages 646–665): Fidelma B. Rigby

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Medical Language for Modern Health Care, 4th edition

 Miscellaneous  Comments Off on Medical Language for Modern Health Care, 4th edition
Feb 122019
 

Medical Language for Modern Health Care, Fourth Edition, uses a Contextual Learning approach to introduce medical terminology within a healthcare environment. Chapters are broken into lessons that present and define terminology through the context of A & P, pathology, diagnostic and therapeutic procedures as well as pharmacology. The text is setup in a way that covers one topic at a time, offering contextual content, tables, and exercises all in one place. Word Analysis and Definition Tables provide a color-coded guide to word parts deconstruction, definitions and pronunciations. Chapters covering Geriatrics, Oncology, Radiology, and Pharmacology offer comprehensive topics coverage. With unfolding patient case studies and documentation, students are introduced to various roles in the healthcare environment, illustrating the real-life application of medical terminology.
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Drug-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction

 Miscellaneous  Comments Off on Drug-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction
Feb 122019
 

This is the definitive, one-stop resource on preclinical drug evaluation for potential mitochondrial toxicity, addressing the issue upfront in the drug development process. It discusses mitochondrial impairment to organs, skeletal muscle, and nervous systems and details methodologies used to assess mitochondria function. It covers both in vitro and in vivo methods for analysis and includes the latest models. This is the authoritative reference on drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction for safety assessment professionals in the pharmaceutical industry and for pharmacologists and toxicologists in both drug and environmental health sciences.Content: Chapter 1 Basic Mitochondrial Physiology in Cell Viability and Death (pages 1–35): Lech Wojtczak and Krzysztof ZablockiChapter 2 Basic Molecular Biology of Mitochondrial Replication (pages 37–70): Immo E. SchefflerChapter 3 Drug?Associated Mitochondrial Toxicity (pages 71–126): Rhea Mehta, Katie Chan, Owen Lee, Shahrzad Tafazoli and Peter J. O’BrienChapter 4 Pharmacogenetics of Mitochondrial Drug Toxicity (pages 127–139): Neil Howell and Corinna HowellChapter 5 Features and Mechanisms of Drug?Induced Liver Injury (pages 141–202): Dominique Pessayre, Alain Berson and Bernard FromentyChapter 6 Cardiovascular Toxicity of Mitochondrial Origin (pages 203–234): Paulo J. Oliveira, Vilma A. Sardao and Kendall B. WallaceChapter 7 Skeletal Muscle and Mitochondrial Toxicity (pages 235–249): Timothy E. JohnsonChapter 8 Manifestations of Drug Toxicity on Mitochondria in the Nervous System (pages 251–271): Ian J. ReynoldsChapter 9 Lipoatrophy and Other Manifestations of Antiretroviral Therapeutics (pages 273–290): Ulrich A. WalkerChapter 10 Nephrotoxicity (pages 291–310): Alberto Ortiz, Alberto Tejedor and Carlos CarameloChapter 11 Drug Effects in Patients with Mitochondrial Diseases (pages 311–324): Eric A. Schon, Michio Hirano and Salvatore DimauroChapter 12 Polarographic Oxygen Sensors, the Oxygraph, and High?Resolution Respirometry to Assess Mitochondrial Function (pages 325–352): Erich GnaigerChapter 13 Use of Oxygen?Sensitive Fluorescent Probes for the Assessment of Mitochondrial Function (pages 353–371): James Hynes, Tom?s C. O’Riordan and Dmitri B. PapkovskyChapter 14 Mitochondrial Dysfunction Assessed Quantitatively in Real Time by Measuring the Extracellular Flux of Oxygen and Protons (pages 373–382): David Ferrick, Min Wu, Amy Swift and Andy NeilsonChapter 15 Assessment of Mitochondrial Respiratory Complex Function in Vitro and in Vivo (pages 383–395): Mark A. Birch?MachinChapter 16 OXPHOS Complex Activity Assays and Dipstick Immunoassays for Assessment of OXPHOS Protein Levels (pages 397–412): Sashi NadanacivaChapter 17 Use of Fluorescent Reporters to Measure Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and the Mitochondrial Permeability Transition (pages 413–431): Anna?Liisa Nieminen, Venkat K. Ramshesh and John J. LemastersChapter 18 Compartmentation of Redox Signaling and Control: Discrimination of Oxidative Stress in Mitochondria, Cytoplasm, Nuclei, and Endoplasmic Reticulum (pages 433–461): Patrick J. Halvey, Jason M. Hansen, Lawrence H. Lash and Dean P. JonesChapter 19 Assessing Mitochondrial Protein Synthesis in Drug Toxicity Screening (pages 463–472): Edward E. McKeeChapter 20 Mitochondrial Toxicity of Antiviral Drugs: A Challenge to Accurate Diagnosis (pages 473–491): Michel P. de Baar and Anthony de RondeChapter 21 Clinical Assessment of Mitochondrial Function via [13C]Methionine Exhalation (pages 493–506): Laura MilazzoChapter 22 Assessment of Mitochondrial Dysfunction by Microscopy (pages 507–538): Ingrid Pruimboom?Brees, Germaine Boucher, Amy Jakowski and Jeanne WolfgangChapter 23 Development of Animal Models of Drug?Induced Mitochondrial Toxicity (pages 539–554): Urs A. Boelsterli and Yie Hou LeeChapter 24 Noninvasive Assessment of Mitochondrial Function Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (pages 555–574): Robert W. Wiseman and J. A. L. JenesonChapter 25 Targeting Antioxidants to Mitochondria by Conjugation to Lipophilic Cations (pages 575–587): Michael P. Murphy
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Current and Future Issues in Hemophilia Care

 Miscellaneous  Comments Off on Current and Future Issues in Hemophilia Care
Feb 122019
 

As haemophilia is a life-long condition, continuing supervision by a group of medical personnel is required. In many countries this is provided by comprehensive care haemophilia centres where staff of all specialities concerned with treatment- haematologists, paediatricians, nurses, physiotherapists, orthopaedic surgeons – have specialized knowledge.This new book is a definitive resource on the current aspects and issues around haemophilia. Complications of haemophilia care are well covered in chapters on inhibitors, and musculoskeletal problems, as are all the latest developments in the field of haemophilia.  Content: Chapter 1 History of Hemophilia (pages 1–5): Caroline Cromwell and Louis M. AledortChapter 2 Hemophilia Care in the Modern World (pages 6–9): Christine A. LeeChapter 3 Comprehensive Care Model in Hemophilia (pages 10–13): Prasad MathewChapter 4 When Should we Switch from On?Demand to Prophylaxis Regimen? (pages 15–20): Jose A. Aznar, Andres Moret, Lydia Abad?Franch, Ana R. Cid, Saturnino Haya and Felipe QuerolChapter 5 Prophylaxis in Children (pages 21–26): Marilyn J. Manco?JohnsonChapter 6 Prophylaxis in Adults with Hemophilia (pages 27–29): Victor Jimenez?Yuste, Emerito?Carlos Rodriguez?Merchan, Maria?Teresa Alvarez?Roman and Monica Martin?SalcesChapter 7 The Economics of Prophylaxis: Does Prophylaxis with Clotting Factor Represent Value for Money? (pages 30–34): Alec MinersChapter 8 The Transition of Care for the Young Adult Hemophilia Patient (pages 35–38): Pia PetriniChapter 9 Perinatal Clinical Care and Molecular Diagnosis in Hemophilia (pages 39–43): Carmen Altisent and Francisco VidalChapter 10 Managing the Mature Person with Hemophilia (pages 44–48): Savita Rangarajan and Thynn Thynn YeeChapter 11 Quality of Life in Hemophilia (pages 49–52): Eduardo RemorChapter 12 Immunology of Inhibitor Development (pages 53–59): Birgit M. Reipert, Christoph J. Hofbauer, Katharina N. Steinitz, Hans?Peter Schwarz and Frank M. HorlingChapter 13 Epidemiology of Inhibitors (pages 60–67): Johanna G. van der BomChapter 14 Early Tolerization to Minimize Inhibitors in PUPs with Hemophilia A (pages 68–73): Gunter Auerswald and Karin KurnikChapter 15 Prediction of Inhibitors in Severe Hemophilia (pages 74–78): H. Marijke van den Berg and Kathelijn FischerChapter 16 Genetic Basis for Inhibitor Development (pages 79–83): Johannes Oldenburg and Anna PavlovaChapter 17 Non?Genetic Risk Factors for Inhibitor Development (pages 84–88): Lisa N. Boggio and Mindy L. SimpsonChapter 18 Immune Tolerance Induction Programs (pages 89–96): Jan Blatny and Prasad MathewChapter 19 Prophylaxis in Hemophilia a Patients with Inhibitors (pages 97–101): Leonard A. Valentino and Guy YoungChapter 20 Treatment of Bleeding in FVIII Inhibitor Patients (pages 102–106): Paul L. F. Giangrande and Jerome TeitelChapter 21 Discordancy of Bypassing Therapy (pages 107–110): Jan AstermarkChapter 22 Experimental Studies on Hemarthrosis, Synovitis and Arthropathy (pages 111–116): Leonard A. Valentino and Narine HakobyanChapter 23 Assessment of Joint Involvement in Hemophilia (pages 117–120): Erik BerntorpChapter 24 Imaging of the Hemophilic Joint (pages 121–126): Carmen Martin?Hervas and Emerito?Carlos Rodriguez?MerchanChapter 25 Initial and Advanced Stages of Hemophilic Arthropathy, and Other Musculo?Skeletal Problems: The Role of Orthopedic Surgery (pages 127–132): Emerito?Carlos Rodriguez?Merchan, Victor Jimenez?Yuste and Nicholas J. GoddardChapter 26 Perioperative Thromboprophylaxis for Persons with Hemophilia Undergoing Orthopedic Surgery (pages 133–137): Gerard Dolan, Donna M. DiMichele and Emerito?Carlos Rodriguez?MerchanChapter 27 New Technologies for the Pharmacokinetic Improvement of Coagulation Factor Proteins (pages 139–145): Leonard A. ValentinoChapter 28 Current and Future Approaches to Gene Therapy in Patients with Hemophilia (pages 146–149): Maria?Teresa Alvarez?Roman, Monica Martin?Salces, Victor Jimenez?Yuste and Emerito?Carlos Rodriguez?MerchanChapter 29 New Developments in Hemophilic Arthropathy (pages 150–155): Emerito?Carlos Rodriguez?Merchan and Leonard A. ValentinoChapter 30 Physiotherapy Evaluation and Intervention in the Acute Hemarthrosis: Challenging the Paradigm (pages 156–161): Nichan Zourikian and Angela L. ForsythChapter 31 Laboratory Assays to Predict Response to Bypassing Agents (pages 162–166): Benny Sorensen and Claude NegrierChapter 32 Combination/Sequential Use of Bypassing Agents (pages 167–170): Alessandro Gringeri
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